Why the aggregate demand curve slopes

 Why the aggregate demand curve slopes downward

The following graph shows the aggregate demand (AD) curve in a hypothetical economy. At point A, the price level is 140, and the quantity of output demanded is $300 billion. Moving down along the aggregate demand curve from point A to point B, the price level falls to 120, and the quantity of output demanded rises to $500 billion.

As the price level falls, the cost of borrowing money will (Rise, fall, remain the same) , causing the quantity of output demanded to (Rise, fall, remain the same)  . This phenomenon is known as the(exchange rate, interest rate , wealth) effect.

Additionally, as the price level falls, the impact on the domestic interest rate will cause the real value of the dollar to (Rise, fall)  in foreign exchange markets. The number of domestic products purchased by foreigners (exports) will therefore (Rise, fall, remain the same) , and the number of foreign products purchased by domestic consumers and firms (imports) will (Rise, fall, remain the same)  . Net exports will therefore (Rise, fall, remain the same) , causing the quantity of domestic output demanded to (Rise, fall, remain the same)  . This phenomenon is known as the (exchange rate, interest rate , wealth)  effect.